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Steve Krah
Steve Krah
Baseball has been sports reporter Steve Krah's passion since childhood. In Season Tickets, there will be plenty of stories from the diamond, but that's not all. Look for stories about athletic happenings and personalties of all kinds.



Other Stories by Steve Krah
Reporter Steve Krah covers sports for the Elkhart Truth.


Pitcher Cuppy was 'painfully slow' more than a century ago

George Cuppy, who retired to Elkhart at the end of his major league career and went into business with big league catcher Lou Criger, was known for his oh-so-slow ambling as a 19th century pitcher.

Posted on Aug. 15, 2014 at 6:50 a.m.

So you think the pace of play debate in baseball is a relatively new thing and they've only been dawdling in the last decade or so?

It turns out, George Cuppy was confounding folks with his snail's pace more than 100 years ago.

Cuppy, who retired to Elkhart at the end of his major league career and went into business with big league catcher Lou Criger, was known for his oh-so-slow ambling as a 19th century pitcher.

The Toledo News Bee called the Indiana native "painfully slow," and Baseball Magazine went into even more detail on his molasses-like mound motions.

“(Cuppy) stood holding the ball, and holding it, and holding it some more," said a Baseball Magazine article. "The maddened batsmen fumed and fretted and smote the plate with their sticks; the umpires barked and threatened; the fans counted and counted, often up to 56 or 59 — and then Cuppy let go of the ball. By this time the batter, if at all nervous or excitable, was so sore that he slammed wildly at the pitch, and seldom hit it."

Cuppy died in 1922 and is buried in Rice Cemetery.


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