Monday, November 24, 2014
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Indiana withdraws from Common Core but what will it change?

Indiana withdrawing from the Common Core, has some saying new standards will be, um, old. One study found more than 70 percent of the new standards for sixth through 12th grade students were directly from Common Core.

Posted on March 25, 2014 at 3:14 p.m.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence signed a bill Monday that formally withdrew Indiana from Common Core education standards, and while he hailed the move as positive, some people are questioning whether the replacement standards are an improvement.

Pence and other conservatives have criticized the Common Core as a top-down takeover of local public schools that doesn't serve Hoosier students.

“I believe when we reach the end of this process there are going to be many other states around the country that will take a hard look at the way Indiana has taken a step back, designed our own standards and done it in a way where we drew on educators, we drew on citizens, we drew on parents and developed standards that meet the needs of our people,” Pence said on Monday.

But some people aren't so certain that the new standards proposed by the Indiana Board of Education are much different.

Retired University of Arkansas professor Sandra Stotsky was hired by Pence to take a look at them. The Associated Press reported that Stotsky found more than 70 percent of the new standards for sixth through 12th grade students were directly from Common Core and additional 20 percent were edited versions. For students in kindergarten to fifth grade, she found about 34 percent of the new standards were directly from Common Core with another 13 percent being edited.

Are you concerned that the new education standards will be too similar to Common Core?


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