Friday, October 24, 2014
Loading...





Ohio State marching band to alter some traditions

Ohio State band's student leaders say group will end nickname tradition, get more training
Posted on Aug. 15, 2014 at 12:00 a.m. | Updated on Aug. 15, 2014 at 10:52 a.m.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Student leaders say Ohio State’s marching band won’t give out nicknames this year, after the sometimes-lewd monikers played a role in the firing of its popular director.

Jonathan Waters was fired July 24 after a two-month university probe concluded he knew about, but failed to stop, a “sexualized” band culture.

Drum Major David Pettit told The Columbus Dispatch (http://bit.ly/1kGPCL0) on Thursday that band members are willing to give up some traditions “to have a better image and be a better band.” They’re also receiving training on sexual harassment and rules for student conduct.

Students generally agreed Waters was pursuing cultural reforms. He had led the band since 2012.

Waters has asked university trustees to reinstate him but school President Michael Drake has stood by the decision.

Information from: The Columbus Dispatch, http://www.dispatch.com


Recommended for You


 FILE - In this Oct. 6, 2012, file photo, women walk by a statue of Joseph and Emma Smith outside the church office building during the 182nd Semiannual General Conference for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City. Mormon church founder Joseph Smith had an underage bride and was married to other men’s wives during the early days of the faith when polygamy was practiced, a new church essay reveals. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints says most of Smith’s wives were between 20 and 40 years old but that one was just 14. While part of the church's early days, polygamy has been banned in the faith since 1890.  (AP Photo/The Salt Lake Tribune, Scott Sommerdorf, File)

Posted 1 hour ago
 In this Oct. 22, 2014 photo Roman numerals mark a timber from the 54-foot oak French frigate La Belle at the Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin, Texas. Archaeologists are beginning to reassemble the remains of the ship recovered more than 300 years after the vessel was lost in a storm off the coast of Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Posted 1 hour ago
Back to top ^