Monday, September 22, 2014
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'Street view' goes undersea to map reefs, wonders

Cameras go underwater as scientists learn to use 'street view' maps for reefs, other wonders

Posted on Aug. 13, 2014 at 12:00 a.m. | Updated on Aug. 13, 2014 at 8:01 a.m.

ISLAMORADA, Fla. (AP) — U.S. government scientists hope people will soon be able to go online and get a 360-degree view of reefs and other underwater wonders, much like Google map’s “street view” lets people look at homes.

This week, scientists are learning to use underwater cameras in the Florida Keys in the hopes of applying 360-degree mapping to research and managing marine sanctuaries nationwide.

Some of the rotating and panoramic images will be available online as early as this week, opening a window into ecosystems still difficult and costly to explore for long stretches of time.

About 400,000 images have been produced so far of reefs off Australia and in the Caribbean, but this is the first time the technology is being used in U.S. waters.




 Assistant patrol agent in charge Lee Allbee, right, talks about the aerostat used by Border Patrol to look for smugglers and illegal crossings in the Rio Grande Valley,  Friday Sept. 5, 2014 at Penitas, Texas.  Since last November, the Border Patrol has stationed five surveillance sky cameras in the Rio Grande Valley area _ one in Penitas, two near Rio Grande City and two near Falfurrias, said agency spokesman Joe Gutierrez Jr.  (AP Photo/The Monitor, Gabe Hernandez)  MAGS OUT; TV OUT

Posted 31 minutes ago
 Uniformed Secret Service officers walk along the fence on the North side of the White House in Washington, Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014.   The Secret Service is coming under intense scrutiny after a man who hopped the White House fence made it all the way through the front door before being apprehended.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Updated 2 hours ago
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