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Officials: Train derails in Virginia; no injuries

Officials say no injuries or hazardous spills reported after train derails in Virginia
Posted on July 14, 2014 at 12:00 a.m. | Updated on July 14, 2014 at 9:48 p.m.

WYTHEVILLE, Va. (AP) — No injuries or hazardous spills have been reported after 14 Norfolk Southern Corp. railroad cars carrying automobiles and fingernail polish derailed Monday night in southwestern Virginia, a county spokesman said.

Wythe County public information officer Jeremy T.K. Farley said in a statement that a 911 call reported a derailment around 6:15 p.m. in the town of Wytheville.

Emergency personnel on scene said they have not found any spilled chemicals and have no reason to believe the public or environment are in any danger, according to the statement.

“It happened in a crowded neighborhood, and we are fortunate that it missed several houses,” Farley told The Associated Press.

No evacuation order was issued, he said, although officials kept some people from returning to homes while the scene was evaluated.

Farley said the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the cause and Norfolk Southern will handle the cleanup. A Norfolk Southern spokesman did not immediately return a message seeking comment late Monday.

Farley said cleanup won’t happen “overnight or even in a day or two.”

Traffic will be diverted in the area tomorrow.




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