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Central Washington wildfire grows dramatically

Central Washington wildfire grows dramatically; another fire starts nearby
Posted on July 10, 2014 at 12:00 a.m. | Updated on July 10, 2014 at 11:58 a.m.

YAKIMA, Wash. (AP) — One central Washington wildfire has burned across 28 square miles in just two days while another has broken out in hot, tinder-dry conditions.

The Mills Canyon fire near Entiat has burned across more than 18,000 acres since it started Tuesday, fire spokesman Rick Scriven said Thursday evening. Residents of about a dozen homes have been told to evacuate, while more than 200 other homes were threatened.

A 30-mile stretch of U.S. Highway 97A reopened Thursday after being closed for 24 hours by the fire.

About 40 miles away, on the west side of Lake Chelan, the new 25-Mile Fire quickly burned across about 350 acres by Thursday evening. Some residents have been told to leave their homes.

By late Thursday night, that fire was burning away from homes and deeper into Forest Service land, KING-TV reported.

About 450 firefighters attacked the Mills Canyon blaze Thursday. None of the fire has been contained, Scriven said.

Firefighting conditions improved a little as the wind dropped.

“We had heavy wind last night, but now things have settled down,” another Mills Canyon fire spokesman, Joe Anderson, said Thursday afternoon.

“Firefighters from all over the state have come in to protect the structures,” Anderson said.

No homes have burned, and there have been no injuries, he said.

Near Spokane, a wildfire near Ford in Stevens County has burned about 1 square mile but was reported 80 percent contained.

Another fire burned two mobile homes, as well as outbuildings and vehicles, near Yakima. It spread across 20 acres of brush before firefighters bulldozed a line around it Wednesday night.




 FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 file photo, an ambulance departs Bellevue Hospital in New York where patients were being evacuated. When Superstorm Sandy slammed into the Northeast nearly two years ago, hospitals found themselves dealing with surges in patients, lost power supplies and employees who couldn’t get to work _ problems that a new federal report finds they were not prepared to handle. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s Inspector General Office released a study Wednesday Sept. 17, 2014 on the emergency preparedness and response during the storm at 172 hospitals in the hardest-hit areas of New York, most of Connecticut and all of New Jersey. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Updated 1 hour ago

Updated 1 hour ago
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