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A look at California serial rapist's release rules

A look at some rules for newly released California 'Pillowcase Rapist'

Posted on July 11, 2014 at 12:00 a.m. | Updated on July 11, 2014 at 6:19 p.m.

“Pillowcase Rapist” Christopher Hubbart has been conditionally released to live in a desert community outside of Palmdale, California, about 70 miles northeast of downtown Los Angeles.

Hubbart has acknowledged raping and assaulting about 40 women between 1971 and 1982. He got his nickname by using a pillowcase to muffle his victims’ screams.

Freedom for the first time in roughly two decades comes with severe limitations. Hubbart must wear a GPS anklet, continue treatment, obey a curfew, and be subject to random searches and seizures, drug testing and polygraph tests.

The 16-page terms of his release detail what Hubbart cannot do without permission. Among them:

— Open a credit card or bank account, buy a car, marry, divorce, buy or lease a home, or make any other major life decision.

— Use the Internet.

— Watch television shows or other media that may arouse him, or ones that involve themes of forced or aggressive sexual acts.

— Work, drive, hitchhike, bike or walk through a neighborhood; join or visit a gym; visit a park, beach or pool; spend time at a bowling alley or its parking lots.

— Possess any video or camera equipment including a phone that allows such capabilities, or have binoculars, telescopes or sexual lubricants.

— Offer money, food, shelter or clothing to those in need.

— Have pets.

— Contact a minor or possess children’s clothing, toys, or games.

— “Knowingly date, have a romantic interest in,” have a sexual relationship or socialize with anyone who has physical custody of a minor.




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