Tuesday, November 25, 2014


Pro Russian armed militants inspect a car near Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, Friday, April 25, 2014. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov has accused the West of plotting to control Ukraine and said the pro-Russian insurgents in the southeast would lay down their arms only if the Ukrainian government clears out the Maidan protest camp in the capital Kiev. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits) (Sergei Grits)

Pro Russian armed militants prepare to inspect a truck near Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, Friday, April 25, 2014. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov has accused the West of plotting to control Ukraine and said the pro-Russian insurgents in the southeast would lay down their arms only if the Ukrainian government clears out the Maidan protest camp in the capital Kiev. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits) (Sergei Grits)

A man holds a candle near a banner showing the sunken ferry Sewol during candlelight vigil for safe return of passengers of the sunken ferry Sewol in Ansan, South Korea, Friday, April 25, 2014. As visiting President Barack Obama offered South Koreans his condolences Friday for the ferry disaster, the South Korean government conceded that some bodies have been misidentified and announced changes to prevent such mistakes from happening again. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man) (Lee Jin-man)

This undated photo provided by his family shows Dr. Jerry Umanos in Afghanistan. Umanos was one of three physicians killed Thursday, April 24, 2014, when an Afghan security guard opened fire on a group of foreign doctors at a hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Family Photo) (AP)

Smoke rises above campaign posters after a series of bombs that exploded Friday, April 25, 2014 at a campaign rally for a Shiite group in Baghdad, Iraq, ahead of the country's parliamentary election. The blasts killed and wounded dozens, officials said. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim) (Karim Kadim)

This image made from video shows a car bomb at the moment of impact, one in a series of bombs that exploded Friday, April 25, 2014 at a campaign rally for a Shiite group in Baghdad, Iraq, ahead of the country's parliamentary election. The blasts killed and wounded dozens, officials said. (AP Photo via AP video) (Uncredited)

FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2013 file photo, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, meets Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank city of Ramallah. Nine months of U.S.-driven diplomacy have left Israelis and Palestinians less hopeful than ever about a comprehensive peace agreement to end their century of conflict. Although a formula may yet be found to somehow prolong the talks past an end-of-April deadline, they are on the brink of collapse and the search is already on for new ideas. (AP Photo/Mohamad Torokman, Pool, File) (Mohamad Torokman)

President Barack Obama waves as he boards Air Force One at Haneda Airport in Tokyo, Friday, April 25, 2014, en route to Osan Air Base in Osan, South Korea. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko) (Eugene Hoshiko)

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2014 photo, Talia Eisenberg, co-founder of the Henley Vaporium, uses her vaping device in New York. Soon, the Food and Drug Administration will propose rules for e-cigarettes. The rules will have big implications for a fast-growing industry and its legions of customers. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File) (Frank Franklin II)

FILE - In this Feb. 23, 1965 file photo, Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, left, knocks out Italian boxer Fabio Bettini in the 10th and last round of their fight at the Falais Des Sports in Paris. Carter, who spent almost 20 years in jail after twice being convicted of a triple murder he denied committing, died at his home in Toronto, Sunday, April 20, 2014, according to long-time friend and co-accused John Artis. He was 76. (AP Photo/File) (Uncredited)

Relatives of mountaineers, killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, cry during the funeral ceremony in Katmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 21, 2014. Buddhist monks cremated the remains of Sherpa guides who were buried in the deadliest avalanche ever recorded on Mount Everest, a disaster that has prompted calls for a climbing boycott by Nepal's ethnic Sherpa community. The avalanche killed at least 13 Sherpas. Three other Sherpas remain missing and are presumed dead. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha) (Niranjan Shrestha)
10 Things to Know: This Week's Takeaways
10 Things to Know: This Week's Takeaways

Posted on April 26, 2014 at 7:32 a.m.

Looking back at the stories to remember from the past week:

1. WAR OF WORDS HEATS UP OVER UKRAINE

The West threatened the Kremlin with more sanctions while Moscow said Friday that pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine would not lay down their arms until activists relinquished control over key occupied sites in Kiev. Ukraine’s deputy foreign minister said he feared an imminent invasion from Russia.

2. GUNMAN KILLS 3 AMERICANS AT HOSPITAL IN AFGHANISTAN’S CAPITAL

Thursday’s attack at Cure International Hospital in Kabul killed Dr. Jerry Umanos, a Chicago pediatrician, Jon Gabel, a health clinic administrator, and his father, Gary. Jon Gabel’s wife was wounded, and the gunman — identified as a government security guard — then shot himself. It was the latest attack on foreigners in Afghanistan that has seen 22 killed this year alone.

3. SUICIDE BOMBERS KILL 33 AT CAMPAIGN RALLY IN BAGHDAD SPORTS STADIUM

Thousands of supporters of a militant Shiite group had gathered in the stadium Friday for a rally to introduce its candidates before next week’s parliamentary election in Iraq. An al-Qaida breakaway group, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, claimed responsibility. The attack raised fears of more sectarian violence.

4. SOUTH KOREA SAYS SOME BODIES MISIDENTIFIED FROM FERRY SINKING

Divers have recovered 187 bodies from the April 16 accident, while 115 are missing and feared dead in the submerged vessel. The government acknowledged Friday there had been mistakes and said remains will be transferred to families when there is a match using DNA testing, fingerprints or dental records.

5. ISRAEL HALTS U.S.-BROKERED PEACE TALKS AFTER PALESTINIAN RECONCILIATION DEAL

Israel made the decision Thursday, after the agreement was reached between the Western-backed Palestinian Authority and the militant group Hamas, the Jewish state’s sworn enemy. Israel objects to any participation in Palestinian politics by Hamas, which has killed hundreds of Israelis in the past two decades.

6. OBAMA SAYS U.S. WOULD DEFEND JAPAN IN ISLANDS DISPUTE WITH CHINA

On an Asian trip, the president affirmed Thursday that Washington would be obligated to defend Tokyo in a confrontation with Beijing over the islands, which are called Senkaku by Japan and Diaoyu by China. Beijing insists it has “indisputable sovereignty” over the islands and that “the so-called Japan-U.S. alliance” should not harm China’s territorial rights.

7. PRIZEFIGHTER RUBIN “HURRICANE” CARTER DIES AT AGE 76

The middleweight title contender, whose murder convictions became an international symbol of racial injustice and inspired a Bob Dylan song and a Hollywood film, died Sunday in Toronto. Carter’s convictions were thrown out after years of appeals.

8. FDA TAKES A LIGHT APPROACH TO REGULATING E-CIGARETTES

The proposed rules, issued Thursday, would ban sales to anyone under 18, add warning labels and require FDA approval for new products. The FDA said it wants more evidence before issuing more regulations and left the door open to further measures, such as a ban on TV advertising and fruit- or candy-flavored e-cigarettes.

9. MANCHESTER UNITED FIRES MANAGER DAVID MOYES

Moyes, whose dismissal was announced Tuesday, came less than a season into a six-year contract with the storied soccer club, one of the most valuable sports franchises in the world. Since Moyes replaced longtime manager Alex Ferguson, however, United is 23 points behind leader Liverpool and has slumped to a string of humiliating defeats, including losses to fierce rivals Liverpool and Manchester City.

10. DOZENS OF SHERPA GUIDES LEAVE MOUNT EVEREST BASE CAMP AFTER DEADLY AVALANCHE

The guides’ actions Wednesday put the entire climbing season in disarray. An avalanche April 18 killed 16 Sherpas and exposed long-simmering resentment by the guides over pay, treatment and benefits. Without the Sherpas, who are key guides and haul tons of gear up the mountain, it would be nearly impossible for climbers to scale Everest, and several expedition companies have canceled their climbs.