Monday, July 28, 2014
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Today is Saturday, August 9, the 221st day of 2013. There are 144 days left in the year.

Posted on July 28, 2014 at 12:02 a.m.
 ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, JULY 28, 2014, AT 12:01 A.M. AND THEREAFTER -  In this May 22, 2014, photo, a ship is docked at Norfolk Southern's Lamberts Point coal terminal as a man plays golf in Norfolk, Va. As the Obama administration weans the U.S. off dirty fuels blamed for global warming, energy companies have been sending more of America’s unwanted energy leftovers to other parts of the world, where they could create even more pollution. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Coal exports help US clean up global warming pollution at home _ but still pollute elsewhere

Updated at 4:09 a.m.
 FILE - In this file photo taken Tuesday July 22, 2014, a missing person poster of Abigail Hernandez displayed in a storefront window in North Conway, N.H., shows Hernandez has been found. Hernandez, 15, returned home nine months after vanishing on her way home from high school. But the happy ending did not put an end to the mystery of where she was, who she was with and just what happened to her. (AP Photo)
Mother of teen back home after missing for 9 months says the girl wasn't pregnant
Updated at 8:22 a.m.
 Palestinians inspect the rubble of a destroyed house following an Israeli strike killing Christian woman Jalila Ayyad, 70, in Gaza City on Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Updated on July 28, 2014 at 12:25 a.m.
Gaza war rages as Hamas, Israel exchange fire despite truce pledges ahead of Muslim holiday
 In this Saturday, July 12, 2014 photo, a migrant girl on her way to the U.S. border, waits for a freight train to depart in Ixtepec, Mexico. Judging by the dramatic increase in the number of minors apprehended in the United States in recent months, it seems the human smuggling business from Central America is booming. The vast majority of migrants who enter the U.S. illegally do so with the help of a network of smugglers known as “coyotes,” so named for the scavengers that prowl the border. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Updated on July 28, 2014 at 12:00 a.m.
AP PHOTOS: A selection of our favorite images from Latin America and the Caribbean
 ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, JULY 28, 2014, AT 12:01 A.M. AND THEREAFTER -  In this May 22, 2014, photo, train cars containing coal roll into an unloading facility at Dominion Terminal Associates' coal terminal in Newport News, Va. As the Obama administration weans the U.S. off dirty fuels blamed for global warming, energy companies have been sending more of America’s unwanted energy leftovers to other parts of the world, where they could create even more pollution. With companies looking to double America’s coal exports, the nation’s growing position in the global energy trade could make global warming worse, fueling the world’s demand for coal when many experts say most fossil fuels should remain in the ground to avert the most disastrous effects of climate change. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Posted on July 28, 2014 at 12:00 a.m.
Coal exports help US clean up global warming pollution at home _ but still pollute elsewhere
 ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, JULY 28, 2014, AT 12:01 A.M. AND THEREAFTER - This image provided by Trianel on July 24, 2013, shows an undated aerial view on the Trianel power plant in Luenen, western Germany. The 750-megawatt Trianel power plant relies completely on coal imports, about half from the U.S. Soon, all of Germany’s coal-fired power plants will be dependent on imports, with the country scheduled to halt all coal mining in 2018 when government subsidies end. Coal mining’s demise in Germany comes as the country is experiencing a resurgence in coal-fired power, one which the U.S. increasingly has helped supply. (AP Photo/Trianel, Guenther Goldstein)
Updated on July 28, 2014 at 12:14 a.m.
US coal exports to German power plants quadruple, adding pollution, as US shuts its own down
 ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, JULY 28, 2014, AT 12:01 A.M. AND THEREAFTER - In this May 22, 2014, photo, homeowner Bob Parsons points to storm waterlines on his garage door in Norfolk, Va. Despite frequent flooding in the neighborhood, Parsons plans to raise his home and stay put. Norfolk’s rapid rate of sea level rise is a combination of subsidence,  the city is sinking, and global sea level rise. Global warming impacts sea level in two ways: As the oceans warm sea water expands and more water is being added to the ocean as ice melts over land. The nexus of the challenge, and its international conundrum, can be found in Norfolk, a low-lying coastal community exports more coal than any place in the U.S.
Posted on July 28, 2014 at 12:00 a.m.
Coal exports help US clean up global warming pollution at home _ but still pollute elsewhere
 FILE - In this June 15, 2009, file photo, Richard Parsons, then Chairman of Citigroup, speaks at Time Warner's headquarters in New York. Parsons, the interim CEO of the Los Angeles Clippers, is is expected to be called as a witness Tuesday, July 22, 2014, to support Shelly Sterling's bid to sell the NBA basketball team for $2 billion to former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
Updated at 3:20 a.m.
It's all over except for final arguments, ruling in trial over $2B Los Angeles Clippers deal
 Gov. Jerry Brown, right, and Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs Jose Antonio Meade Kuribrena  leave a news conference after talking with reporters Wednesday, July 23, 2014, in Sacramento, Calif.  Brown and Meade attended a luncheon hosted by the California Chamber of Commerce, where they discussed Brown's upcoming visit to Mexico.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Updated at 3:32 a.m.
Gov. Jerry Brown to meet with Mexican president to discuss immigration during trade mission
 ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, JULY 28, 2014, AT 12:01 A.M. AND THEREAFTER - In this May 22, 2014, photo, sunlight reflects off of a chunk of coal at Dominion Terminal Associates' coal terminal in Newport News, Va. As the Obama administration weans the U.S. off polluting fuels blamed for global warming, energy companies have been sending more of America’s unwanted energy leftovers to other parts of the world where they could create even more pollution. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Posted on July 28, 2014 at 12:00 a.m.
5 things to know about how US coal exports shift global warming problem onto other countries
 In this May 22, 2014 photo, a couple rides in a cart on a golf course located next to Norfolk Southern's Lamberts Point coal terminal, top, in Norfolk, Va. Over the last six years, as the U.S. has reduced its use of coal, helping to make America greener, energy companies have sent more coal than ever overseas to meet rising demand. And there are plans for more. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Updated at 5:02 a.m.
AP PHOTOS: As Norfolk battles sea level rise, its coal exports contribute to global warming
 FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 8, 2010, file photo, shoppers walk out of a Dollar Tree store in Barre, Vt. Dollar Tree is buying rival discount store Family Dollar in a cash-and-stock deal valued at about $8.5 billion, the companies announced Monday, July 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)
Updated at 6:21 a.m.
Dollar Tree buying peer Family Dollar Stores for approximately $8.5 billion

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