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Suits in triple-slaying proceeds case move ahead

Civil lawsuits moving ahead in contested insurance, estate proceeds after triple slaying
Posted on Aug. 14, 2014 at 12:00 a.m. | Updated on Aug. 14, 2014 at 10:39 a.m.

NEW ALBANY, Ind. (AP) — A former Indiana state trooper shouldn’t be allowed to claim all $626,000 in insurance and estate proceeds from the deaths of his wife and two children 14 years ago, even though he was acquitted of their murders, attorneys representing the family members argue in civil lawsuits.

Attorneys for the parents of David Camm’s late wife filed the suits and argue that some of the money should go toward the family’s legal fees for attorney Nick Stein. Stein has represented Frank and Janice Renn since their daughter, Kim Renn, and grandchildren, Brad, 7, and Jill, 5, were slain in September 2000 in their southern Indiana home.

Juries convicted Camm twice on murder charges in the killings. Both convictions were overturned on appeal and Camm was acquitted last fall in the slayings following his third trial.

Camm lawyer David Mosley said during a Tuesday meeting of attorneys for the two sides in Floyd Circuit Judge Terrence Cody’s chambers that the money should go to Camm alone.

The Renns and Stein “need to wake up and smell the coffee,” Mosley said after Tuesday’s meeting, during which three different cases related to three victims’ estates were discussed, The Courier-Journal reported. Camm “was acquitted. He did not harm Kim, Brad and Jill,” Mosley added.

Stein said Tuesday that if Camm was responsible for the killings, he is not eligible to receive the funds, the News and Tribune reported.

“Being acquitted doesn’t mean you didn’t do it, it just means that the state didn’t prove beyond a reasonable doubt you did,” he said. “We feel he’s responsible for his family’s deaths or there wouldn’t be any more litigation.”

The civil cases involve how to distribute $167,403 held in certificates of deposit in the three estates, and $458,672 from three life insurance policies.

Two suits involving some of the benefits are pending in Cody’s court while a third centered on proceeds from two policies related to Kim Camm’s job at the former Aegon USA is pending in U.S. District Court in New Albany.

During a recent status conference, Federal Magistrate Judge William G. Hussman Jr. indicated that settling all of the cases together may now be best, Stein said.

He set a settlement conference for Nov. 14.

Even after the civil cases are resolved, it won’t end all the litigation spawned by the case. Camm filed notice in April that he intends to sue a string of Floyd County officials for damages stemming from his wrongful convictions. He’s seeking $30 million.


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