Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Loading...


INDIANA (73)
Updated at 12:41 a.m.
Ogwumike scores 21 as Sparks edge Fever 77-73

Updated at 12:47 a.m.
Seymour to retire 4th police dog since 2010; departure leaves force with 1 K9 officer
Updated 2 hours ago
Updated 2 hours ago
South Bend Common Council member facing drunken driving charge takes medical leave of absence
Updated 2 hours ago
Bridges between Henderson, Evansville undergoing inspection; lanes will be restricted
Updated 2 hours ago
Indiana higher education chief kicks off '15 to Finish' college credit load campaign
Updated 2 hours ago
Indiana U. commemorating WWI centennial in 2014-15; Lugar, Hamilton to join Nov. 4 discussion
Updated 43 minutes ago
Coroner rules Lafayette toddler's death a homicide; 14-month-old girl suffered head injury
 Army veteran Eugene Zimmerman smiles as he checks out following an appointment Thursday at the new Veterans Affairs Community Based Outpatient Clinic on Western Avenue in South Bend. Zimmerman and his wife, Bonnie, traveled from their home in Bremen to the new facility.
Posted at 8:34 p.m.

Veterans’ desired appointment times were commonly altered to make wait times look better, according to a release from the federal agency.

 This June 20, 2014, photo show Boardman Coal Plant technician Paz Barratta as he operated the control room in Boardman, Ore. The plant is scheduled to close in 2020. The end of coal here will help Oregon meet the Obama administration’s latest proposal to slash pollution blamed for global warming. If all goes according to plan for global energy conglomerate Amber Energy, coal will still arrive in Boardman, Ore., but instead of feeding the coal plant, it would be shipped to Asia. (AP Photo/Nigel Duara)
Updated on July 28, 2014 at 4:40 a.m.
Coal exports help US clean up global warming pollution at home _ but still pollute elsewhere
 In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia. On Saturday, July 26, 2014, the North Carolina-based aid organization said Brantly tested positive for the disease and was being treated at a hospital in Monrovia. (AP Photo/Samaritan's Purse)
Updated on July 28, 2014 at 5:43 a.m.
CDC: Little risk to US seen from Ebola outbreak in Africa; 2 American aid workers infected
 This photo provided by the CDC shows an ebola Virus. U.S. health officials are monitoring the Ebola outbreak in Africa but say the risk of the deadly germ spreading to the United States is remote. (AP Photo/CDC)
Updated at 8:25 p.m.
Friend: Doctor who contracted Ebola was exhausted after months of treating patients in Liberia
Updated on July 28, 2014 at 11:41 a.m.
Indiana surgeon faces attempted murder charges for alleged plot to kill his ex-wife

Featured


Loading...
Loading...
Updated on July 28, 2014 at 5:05 p.m.
Updated on July 28, 2014 at 4:20 p.m.
Updated on July 28, 2014 at 3:23 p.m.
 In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia. On Saturday, July 26, 2014, the North Carolina-based aid organization said Brantly tested positive for the disease and was being treated at a hospital in Monrovia. (AP Photo/Samaritan's Purse)
Updated on July 28, 2014 at 2:23 p.m.
Back to top ^