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5 things to know for your Saturday in Indiana

The Elkhart Truth answers why an overpass is being built on Prairie Street instead of Main Street, Elkhart’s retiring bus drivers share their memories and three other stories to start your day.

Posted on June 7, 2014 at 3:38 a.m.

Ask the Truth: Why build an overpass on Prairie Street instead of Main Street?

Elkhart city manager Mike Machlan said that the gradual incline and decline of the overpass would require a lengthy structure that would abut many other structures north of the railroad track. This would limit access to those buildings on Main Street south of Division Street. This also applies to the construction of an underpass, but that would require the construction of a temporary track to permit work and allow continued train traffic. Such a temporary track would mean several structures in the area would have to be demolished to make space. Machlan adds that the construction of an overpass would speed traffic through the city center, but slower traffic would facilitate commerce and activity in the area.

Furthermore, Dunlap does not have an overpass because there are no funds.

Elkhart's retiring bus drivers share memories

Sixteen bus drivers and helpers with the district will retire at the end of the school year. Other drivers will take their place and their numbers will grow to help improve transportation routes, one of the promises of the referendum passed in spring. Ten bus drivers shared their memories with The Elkhart Truth, citing different reasons for retiring. Some want to spend more time with family, others want to start getting pension payments from the state.

Elkhart mayor downplays lead dangers from Prairie Street demolition, but others remain leery

Fourteen buildings are being torn down along Prairie Street in Elkhart for a railroad overpass project, and some residents are concerned that the wafting dust contains lead particles from lead-based paint. Elkhart Mayor Dick Moore released a statement Friday, June 6, assuring that there should be no environmental problems as a result of the demolition. However, Carolyn Hunt of Elkhart will organize a campaign to inform neighbors living around the demolition site about the dangers of lead and lead poisoning.

Bicyclists donate to Elkhart County 4-H Fair’s food drive, aim to beat Guinness World Record

Bicyclists rode from downtown Goshen to the Elkhart County 4-H Fairgrounds on Friday, June 6, to collect food for the Food Bank of Elkhart County located at Church Community Services in Elkhart. The fair board is trying to collect more than 600,000 pounds of food on July 20 so it can break the world record for the most food collected by a food drive in a 24-hour period.

Elkhart Main Street railroad crossing to close for two days

The Norfolk Southern railroad crossing on South Main Street near Middlebury Street will be closed Sunday, June 8, and Monday, June 9. Railroad crews will be working on the crossing.




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