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More snow, frigid temps in the forecast

How far did Friday morning temps fall?

Posted on Jan. 3, 2014 at 12:00 a.m. | Updated on Jan. 3, 2014 at 3:42 p.m.

ELKHART — If you thought temperatures this morning were cold, get ready for more.

Low temps Friday morning, Jan. 3, ranged from minus 6 in Elkhart to minus 9 in Goshen and Warsaw, according to the National Weather Service.

Temperatures are expected to reach a high of about 13 Friday.

Temps will continue to hover in the low teens, but winds will pick up at night and range from 15 to 20 mph, with gusts of 30 mph. The low is expected to be about 12, but the wind chill will feel more like minus 5, the weather service said.

Temperatures will creep up into the mid 20s on Saturday. Windy conditions will create blowing snow and by Saturday night, a new round of snowfall will begin.

The weather service predicts snowfall will begin late Saturday night and continue late Sunday night with total accumulations of 6 to 10 inches.

Gusty winds on Sunday are expected to cause blowing and drifting snow and visibility could be reduced.

Lows Saturday night will be around 23.

The high temperature for Sunday will be around 24.

Sunday afternoon, temperatures will plummet, with a local low expected to be around minus 9 degrees. Wind chills Sunday night could be minus 10 to minus 20.

Monday's high is expected to be minus 7, with lows falling to a predicted minus 13, the weather service said.

Wind chills Monday night could be minus 35 or even minus 40, the weather service said.

Reports of pipe freeze-ups in Bristol

Bristol has received reports of water pipes freezing.

Water customers are advised to let their water run in a small stream when temperatures reach 10 degrees above zero.

For tips on preventing and thawing frozen pipes, click here.





Updated 1 hour ago
 In this Aug. 21, 2014 photo Jim Corbin, a plant protection specialist with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture, walks through the forest near Bryson City, N.C., looking for wild ginseng plants. The legal ginseng hunting season begins Sept. 16, and Corbin and his colleagues are spreading harmless yellow dye on the plant’s roots to discourage poachers. He says dealers are alerted not to buy plants with the dyed roots. But with wild ginseng root fetching upward of $900 a pound, untold numbers of poachers have taken to local forests. (AP Photo/Mitch Weiss)

Updated 1 hour ago

Updated 1 hour ago
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