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Elkhart County home sales edge up in November, price unchanged

Elkhart County home sales edged up in November compared to a year earlier.

Posted on Dec. 24, 2013 at 12:00 a.m. | Updated on Dec. 24, 2013 at 11:20 a.m.

INDIANAPOLIS — Home sales in Elkhart County edged up in November compared to a year earlier and year-to-date sales for the first 11 months of 2013 also surpassed numbers for 2012.

Here are the highlights from the latest home sales report from the Indiana Association of Realtors, released Monday, Dec. 23:

Ÿ Home sales in Elkhart County totaled 145 in November, up 9 percent from 133 in November 2012. Year-to-date sales reached 1,689, up 4.5 percent from 1,617 a year earlier.

Ÿ The median home sales price in November totaled $112,000, unchanged from a year earlier. The year-to-date median sales price reached $109,900, up from $100,000 a year earlier.

Ÿ The inventory of homes for sale totaled 1,017 in November, 6.7 months worth of inventory, down from 1,051 a year earlier, or 7.3 months of inventory. New listings year-to-date totaled 2,528, up 3.1 percent from 2,452 a year earlier.

Across Indiana:

Ÿ Home sales totaled 5,475 in November, down 1.6 percent from 5,566 a year earlier. Year-to-date sales through November totaled 70,351, up 14.3 percent from 61,541 in 2012.

Ÿ The median home sales price in November was $120,000, up from $119,500 last year. The year-to-date median sales price was $122,500, up from $118,000.

“Significant gains in both sales and prices were made in many markets across the state,” Kevin Kirkpatrick, the Indiana Association of Realtors president said in a statement. “Consumers feel empowered by low prices and interest rates, but on the other hand, sellers are starting to have an advantage. Real employment and wage growth, as well as consumer confidence and mortgage availability, hold the key to success in 2014.”


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