Friday, October 24, 2014


West Goshen School third-grader Andrea Lopez quietly reads and eat carrots during class Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Students in a portion of the school are continuing to receive the veggie snack through a grant from IU Health Goshen Hospital. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

West Goshen School first-grader Gustavo Juarez grimaces as he struggles to open a bad of carrots during class Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Students in a portion of the school are continuing to receive the veggie snack through a grant from IU Health Goshen Hospital. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

West Goshen School first-grader Gustavo Juarez, left, laughs as he struggles to open a bag of carrots during class Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Students in a portion of the school are continuing to receive the veggie snack through a grant from IU Health Goshen Hospital. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

Bags of carrots sit on desks in a third grade class as students read and eat the carrots during class Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Students in a portion of the school are continuing to receive the veggie snack through a grant from IU Health Goshen Hospital. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

West Goshen School first-grader Gabriel Calderon struggles to open a bag of carrots during class Friday, Nove. 8, 2013. Students in a portion of the school are continuing to receive the veggie snack through a grant from IU Health Goshen Hospital. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

Students in a West Goshen School third-grade class quietly read and eat carrots during class Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Students in a portion of the school are continuing to receive the veggie snack through a grant from IU Health Goshen Hospital. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

West Goshen School first-grader Gabriel Calderon holds a carrot in his mouth as he looks at the rest of the bag during class Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Students in a portion of the school are continuing to receive the veggie snack through a grant from IU Health Goshen Hospital. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

West Goshen School first-grader Brody Aistrop listens to his teacher, LaDene Nesbitt, as he eats a slice of carrot during class Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Students in a portion of the school are continuing to receive the veggie snack through a grant from IU Health Goshen Hospital. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

West Goshen School first-grader Stevan Serrano listens to his teacher, LaDene Nesbitt, as he eats a slice of carrot during class Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Students in a portion of the school are continuing to receive the veggie snack through a grant from IU Health Goshen Hospital. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

West Goshen School third-grader David Perez takes a bite of a coin-shaped carrot as he reads during class Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Students in a portion of the school are continuing to receive the veggie snack through a grant from IU Health Goshen Hospital. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)
Students still getting their veggies
Posted on Nov. 10, 2013 at 12:00 a.m.

GOSHEN — Third-grade teacher Kim Rock recently saw one of her students try a blueberry for the first time.

“It’s kind of fun to see someone eat a blueberry or a strawberry for the first time, because you know they are very good,” Rock said, smiling.

Her students and others at two Goshen elementary schools eat a fresh fruit or vegetable snack twice a week thanks to a grant from IU Health Goshen. The United States Department of Agriculture began funding a similar program for schools several years ago, but this year West Goshen and Chandler elementaries didn’t have a high enough population of students receiving free and reduced lunches to qualify. A third Goshen elementary school, Chamberlain, is still doing the USDA fruit and vegetable snack program.

Representatives of IU Health Goshen heard that some Goshen students could be losing their snack and decided to help.

“We have a long-standing partnership with Goshen Community Schools, and we’ve worked on several projects together over the years,” said Stacy Bowers of IU Health Goshen.

Since childhood obesity and children’s overall health is a concern for the community, Bowers continued, it made sense for the hospital to keep the fruit and vegetable program alive. The program as funded by IU Health Goshen will last only six weeks.

First-graders clamored for small bags of carrots cut into coin shapes Friday afternoon at West Goshen, but the room grew suddenly quiet when their teacher reminded them that they were eating roots. The wide-eyed children kept eating, but with a newfound respect for their “carrot coins.”

LaDene Nesbitt said the students always love a snack and learning where the food comes from is an added benefit.

“With any luck, we’ve got kids who are aware of something that they may not have otherwise been,” Nesbitt said.

School nurse Laura Horning said that the idea is to get kids eating healthy. If kids eat apples at school, for example, they might ask their parents to buy apples the next time they are at the grocery store.