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Fees to increase at Elkhart’s railroad museum

Admission fees will go up by $1 at the National New York Central Railroad Museum in Elkhart on Jan. 1.

Posted on Nov. 6, 2013 at 12:00 a.m. | Updated on Nov. 6, 2013 at 2:12 p.m.

ELKHART — Admission fees at the National New York Central Railroad Museum will go up Jan. 1.

The Elkhart Board of Public Works on Tuesday, Nov. 5, approved a $1 increase in fees. Admission will become $6 for adults and $5 for seniors 61 or older and children ages 4 to 12. Children 3 and younger will still get in for free.

Also per Tuesday’s action, the price of riding the Nibco Express train on the railroad museum grounds will go to 50 cents. Currently it’s free.

Robin Hume, museum coordinator, said the hike will help fees keep up with inflation and generate more revenue for the facility. Per her perusal of available records, fees at the city-funded museum haven’t gone up since at least 2002, she said.

The higher fees are in line with what other museums in St. Joseph, Elkhart and LaGrange counties charge, according to Hume.

Also Tuesday, the Elkhart Board of Public Works approved a contract with Frost Engineering calling on the firm to conduct a structural analysis of the three freight houses that hold the bulk of the museum collection. The analysis, to determine what sort of repair and rehabilitation work may be needed, would be used in seeking grant funds for the necessary work.




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 In this Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, photo, farm workers, from left, Carlos Sanchez, Francisco Zuniga, and Alejandro Zuniga, pick tobacco leaves on Chris Haskins' farm in Chatham, Va. Starting next month, America’s remaining tobacco growers will be totally exposed to the laws of supply and demand. The very last buyout checks go out in October to about 425,000 tobacco farmers and landowners. They’re the last holdovers from a price-support and quota system that had guaranteed minimum prices for most of the 20th century, sustaining a way of life that began 400 years ago in Virginia. (AP Photo/Johnny Clark)

Updated 57 minutes ago
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