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Goshen College starts new bicycle program

Goshen College recently introduced bike tours of campus for prospective students.

Posted on Nov. 4, 2013 at 12:00 a.m. | Updated on Nov. 4, 2013 at 1:32 p.m.

GOSHEN — A new program at Goshen College lets prospective students tour the campus by bike.

Several bikes that were abandoned on campus over the years were repaired and repainted by students, and they are now available for visitors to the school to use.

Richard Aguirre, director of the Communications and Marketing Office for Goshen College and the initiator of the new program, said he believes Goshen College has a “bicycle culture” that should be shared with visitors.

“All colleges and universities have many bicyclists and bicycles,” Aguirre said in an email on Thursday, Oct. 31. “At Goshen, however, students seem to prefer simple bikes ... and the funkier the better.”

The bikes in the borrowing program were painted and designed by art students several years ago, Aguirre added.

This new program is different from the college’s earlier “purple bike” program, Glenn Gilbert, utilities manager and sustainability coordinator for Goshen College, said.

“About 16 years ago, a couple students thought that it would be nice to assemble a few bikes, paint them purple (Goshen College’s color), and leave them on campus for anyone to borrow,” Gilbert said in an email on Thursday. “Unfortunately, the community did not share well and the bikes soon disappeared from campus or were misused and abandoned. The current program is very different.”

Gilbert added that the bikes for prospective students and visitors are secured at a designated area and must be “checked out” at the recreational fitness center. The bicycle borrowing program will be managed through the admissions office, he added.




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