Tuesday, September 16, 2014
Loading...





Why are Goshen schools struggling to find substitute teachers?

Goshen Schools are having some difficulty finding substitute teachers.
Posted on Sept. 25, 2013 at 1:00 a.m. | Updated on Sept. 25, 2013 at 1:13 p.m.

GOSHEN — An uptick in the local economy is causing a problem for Goshen schools.

Marceil Royer, assistant superintendent of human resources for Goshen Community School, reported during a school board meeting Tuesday, Sept. 24, that one of the challenges the schools are facing is a lack of quality substitute teachers.

Royer said later that many people who had been substitute teaching for Goshen Schools have found regular jobs elsewhere.

“It’s because the economy has picked up, and people are doing other jobs,” Royer said after the meeting. “Also, we’ve hired a lot of our substitute teachers into full-time teaching positions.”

She added that additional Title I funds have made it possible for the school corporation to hire about 15 former substitute teachers. That’s made the pool of substitute teachers much smaller, however.

So what would a person need to be a substitute teacher at Goshen schools?

Royer said all substitute teachers must have at least 60 hours of college credit. Also, they need to be able to relate well to students, follow the regular teacher’s lesson plans and take their job seriously.

“We try to refer to our substitute teachers as ‘guest teachers,’” Royer said. “That brings some respect to the position.”

Substitute teacher job descriptions and instructions on how to apply are posted on the Goshen schools website under “Employment at GCS.




Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
 In this Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, photo, farm workers, from left, Carlos Sanchez, Francisco Zuniga, and Alejandro Zuniga, pick tobacco leaves on Chris Haskins' farm in Chatham, Va. Starting next month, America’s remaining tobacco growers will be totally exposed to the laws of supply and demand. The very last buyout checks go out in October to about 425,000 tobacco farmers and landowners. They’re the last holdovers from a price-support and quota system that had guaranteed minimum prices for most of the 20th century, sustaining a way of life that began 400 years ago in Virginia. (AP Photo/Johnny Clark)

Updated 54 minutes ago
Back to top ^