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County board agrees to help pay for paving in Elkhart

The Elkhart County Redevelopment Commission will kick in $125,000 toward paving C.R. 6 in the north part of Elkhart.
Posted on Aug. 23, 2013 at 1:00 a.m. | Updated on Aug. 23, 2013 at 11:59 a.m.

GOSHEN — The Elkhart County Redevelopment Commission is stepping in to help pay for roadwork on C.R. 6 in the north part of Elkhart after the city’s paving funds came up short.

Elkhart County commissioner Mike Yoder told the commission Thursday, Aug. 22, that the city and county highway engineers typically coordinate paving plans where county roads intersect with city limits. But this year, he said the city of Elkhart had a shortfall and could not pave part of C.R. 6 between Northland and Decio drives. The county redevelopment commission agreed to kick in $125,000 for the roadwork.

“Taxpayers expect us to do a good job with the tax dollars,” Yoder said. “It doesn’t matter to the taxpayer whether he’s paying it to the city or the county or the township or whatever. They expect us to do a good job, and that’s what we’re trying to do. We’re not going to leave that section of road unpaved.”

The county redevelopment commission had also agreed in May to help foot the bill to pave parts of Pierina Drive and C.R. 6 northeast of Elkhart by using $770,000 from a tax increment financing, or TIF, district.

The cost to pave the section of C.R. 6 in the city was estimated at $125,000 before the bids for the county’s paving program were complete, Yoder noted.

“It turns out that’s $20,000 short of what we need,” he said. “I’m not asking for more today. The county is going to cover that portion. We found $20,000 in savings in a different bid package that did come in a little bit less, so we’re able to move some money around.”




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 In this Aug. 13, 2014 photo, an overall view of the Firstkontact Center, a call center in the northern border city of Tijuana, Mexico. Many Mexicans deported under U.S. President Barack Obama are finding employment in call centers in Tijuana and other border cities. In perfect English, some don’t even speak Spanish, they talk to American consumers who buy gadgets and gizmos, have questions about warrantees and complain about overdue deliveries. A large number of workers spent nearly all their lives in the U.S. and still have family there, a major selling point for Mexico over English-language industry leaders like India and the Philippines. (AP Photo/Alex Cossio)

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