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Roundabout work underway at C.R. 6-Ash Road intersection

The C.R. 6-Ash Road crossing is set to close to traffic Wednesday, July 23, to accommodate construction of a roundabout at the intersection.

Posted on July 23, 2013 at 1:00 a.m. | Updated on July 23, 2013 at 5:45 p.m.

ELKHART — St. Joseph County officials confirmed plans to close the C.R. 6-Ash Road crossing starting Wednesday, July 23, to accommodate construction of a roundabout at the crossing.

Work started Tuesday, according to the St. Joseph County Department of Public Works, and both roadways will be closed to traffic at the intersection starting Wednesday as construction moves ahead in earnest. The project’s start faced a slight delay as the contractor, Goshen-based Rieth-Riley, awaited removal of all power, telecommunication and other utility lines from the right-of-way.

Plans call for construction of a roundabout to address congestion at the busy crossing. The intersection will be closed so the work, expected to last two months until around Sept. 22, can be completed more quickly.

The project, right at the St. Joseph County-Elkhart County line, is a joint effort between the two counties. It has a total price tag of around $1.75 million, including construction, land acquisition and design, and around $1 million of that is coming from the feds, according to Jessica Clark, the St. Joseph County engineer. The rest will be split evenly between the two counties.

By itself, construction, being handled by Rieth-Riley, has a price tag of $1.16 million, according to Clark.

Clark said an existing roundabout at Cleveland Road and Bittersweet Road to the west of the one to take shape has helped address congestion there and generated generally favorable comments from the public.




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