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Elkhart’s Atlas Die acquires Michigan company

Elkhart-based Atlas Die, LLC, acquired Bernal Inc. of Rochester Hills, Mich., in July, expanding the packaging company's reach.

Posted on July 13, 2013 at 1:00 a.m. | Updated on July 13, 2013 at 4:10 p.m.

ELKHART — A local tooling leader is growing.

Elkhart-based Atlas Die, LLC, which has two local facilities among its others, bought Bernal Inc., a company in Rochester Hills, Mich., to add to its operations and abilities.

As part of the sale, Atlas picked up a joint venture in Shanghai, China, called Bernal-Yawa.

The addition of Bernal will offer customers a complete tooling suite of steel rule, flexible and solid rotary dies along with system design and integration, according to Atlas. The sale happened July 3, and the company announced it a week later.

Ken Smott, president and chief executive of Atlas, said the combination of the companies “marries two respected market leaders with the greatest depth of converting knowledge and product breadth.”

Smott also said, “Having strong manufacturing and distribution channels in the U.S. and China, Bernal enhances our technology leadership and extends our global access to key clients and markets.”

Marc Voorhees, Bernal’s vice president of sales, said, “We look forward to working with the Atlas team and combining our strengths in packaging while we jointly develop other market opportunities.”

Bernal will continue to operate in Michigan, with Smott overseeing it along with the Atlas facilities in Massachusetts, Illinois, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia.

The Atlas facilities in Elkhart both received safety certifications from the state within the last year.


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