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Indiana Toll Road rate for autos to rise 3.2 percent to $9.70

Rates for motorists paying cash on the Indiana Toll Road go up on July 1.

Posted on June 19, 2013 at 1:00 a.m. | Updated on June 19, 2013 at 3:55 p.m.

It’s going to be a bit more expensive to travel on the Indiana Toll Road come July 1, if you’re a cash-paying customer.

If you have a transponder, relax. Your rates will stay the same.

Per the July 1 change, permitted in the lease that granted the ITR Concession Co. management of the 157-mile toll road in 2006, the cost of a full ride across Indiana for a standard auto will go up 3.2 percent, from $9.40 to $9.70.

The fee totaled $8.80 through June 30, 2011, but the lease allowed for annual hikes starting July 1, 2011, when it increased to $9.

The rate for Class 5 users — five-axle semi-tractor trailers — will go to $38.70 on July 1, according to the ITRCC, up from $37.40.

The rate for those with transponders, devices that let motorists pay tolls electronically, has held steady at $4.65 and that stays in effect until at least July 1, 2016. That’s when the lease grants the ITRCC authority to increase the transponder rate for the first time.

As of July 1, 2011, the ITRCC lease allows for annual rate hikes for cash customers of either 2 percent, the equivalent of the rise in the U.S. consumer price index or the equivalent in the change in the U.S. gross domestic product, whichever is larger. The looming change is based on last year’s U.S. GDP increase, according to ITRCC spokeswoman Amber Kettring.

Actual toll charges vary based on vehicle class and distance traveled.




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