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Notre Dame anthropology professor Mark Schurr, right, pushes a ground-penetrating radar system over property at the Havilah Beardsley House at Beardsley Avenue and North Main Street Wednesday, June 12, 2013. IUSB sociology and anthropology professor Jay VanderVeen, left, worked with Schurr and a couple of recent graduates to use the technology to search for areas that might have been where tunnels were at the time the Beardsley family lived in the home. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

Notre Dame anthropology professor Mark Schurr, right, records findings from a ground-penetrating radar system at the Havilah Beardsley House at Beardsley Avenue and North Main Street Wednesday, June 12, 2013. IUSB sociology and anthropology professor Jay VanderVeen, left, worked with Schurr and a couple of recent graduates to use the technology to search for areas that might have been where tunnels were at the time the Beardsley family lived in the home. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)

Notre Dame anthropology professor Mark Schurr, left, and IUSB sociology and anthropology professor Jay VanderVeen, right, lead students from Beardsley Park to the Havilah Beardsley House at Beardsley Avenue and North Main Street Wednesday, June 12, 2013. The professors were using a ground-penetrating radar system to search for voids beneath the surface that might indicate where tunnels were at the time the Beardsley family lived in the home. (Truth Photo By Jennifer Shephard) (AP)
Havilah Beardsley SAA

Posted on June 13, 2013 at 1:00 a.m. | Updated on June 13, 2013 at 7:07 p.m.

ELKHART — Mark Schurr, a Notre Dame anthropology professor, Jay VanderVeen, an Indiana University South Bend sociology and anthropology professor, and some recent graduates visited the Havilah Beardsley House to investigate areas on the property where there may have been tunnels.