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Former Bristol resident hanging on hope for kidney

Kathy Weaver looks to find a kidney donor.

Posted on May 15, 2013 at 1:00 a.m. | Updated on May 15, 2013 at 4:19 p.m.

An accident in 1971 left Kathy Weaver with one kidney.

“I was on a hay wagon hit by a box truck driven by a drunk,” Weaver said.

Now, Weaver has less than 10 percent function in the one kidney she has left. She has been on dialysis for over a year, looking for a donor.

“You know, 3 1/2 hours of dialysis is a long time,” Weaver said. “You are tied to a three-time-a-week schedule that takes a little over 10 hours a week for all of it. It’s a lot to go through, but I’m glad I’m alive.”

Originally from the Bristol area, Weaver is a former owner of Bittersweet Kennels in Pierceton and a grandmother of two.

“Her grandkids are only 5 and 2, so she would like to see them grow up obviously,” said Christine Weaver, Kathy’s daughter-in-law. “She’s young, 65 years old, and loved.”

Currently on the Lutheran Health Network transplant list, Weaver is making the transition to the IU Health transplant list. Her son is a match but unable to donate due to previous back injuries.

“She has had some major scares,” said Christine Weaver. “It’s been very stressful. She’s been on dialysis for a year and a half and it is stressful that nothing has happened yet.”

The family hopes that, in raising awareness, Kathy Weaver will be able to find a donor. She has plans for when one is located.

“I will spend more time with my grandkids for sure, and celebrate,” she said.

Those interested in being tested as a match for Weaver may contact Kelly Coffey of IU Health at 800-382-4602.




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