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Indiana House approves measure limiting mo-peds to 30 mph

Indiana House passes measure prohibiting going over 30 mph in mopeds and now it'll go to the Senate.

Posted on Feb. 25, 2013 at 12:00 a.m.

Editor’s note: The article has been corrected to clarify details of a provision of H.B. 1523 related to where mo-ped operators may travel in the roadway.

You won’t be able to race like a speed demon on your mo-ped, according to a measure approved by the Indiana House and now headed to the Senate.

House Bill 1523, approved by House lawmakers on Monday, Feb. 25, would prohibit operation of mo-peds at speeds exceeding 30 mph. Moreover, starting Jan. 1, 2014, owners would have to register their mo-peds with the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles, much like motorcycles.

The House approved the measure 75-18 and now it goes to the Indiana Senate, according to Indiana Rep. Tim Neese, R-Elkhart, who supported it.

The bill, as passed, also requires mo-ped operators to drive in the right-hand lane of traffic “when available,” except when making a left-hand turn.

This is the third time in the last six years that the issue has come before Indiana lawmakers, said Neese, who has pushed for such a measure. He said many accidents in Elkhart County involve mo-peds.

Per H.B. 1523, those traveling faster than 30 mph could potentially be ticketed.




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