Friday, October 31, 2014


State Representative Tim Neese talks to the League of Women Voters of Elkhart County about the upcoming state legislative session at a luncheon at the Matterhorn Conference Center in Elkhart on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2012. (Truth Photo By Evey Wilson) (AP)

State Representative Tim Neese talks to the League of Women Voters of Elkhart County about the upcoming state legislative session at a luncheon at the Matterhorn Conference Center in Elkhart on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2012. (Truth Photo By Evey Wilson) (AP)

State Representative Tim Neese talks to the League of Women Voters of Elkhart County about the upcoming state legislative session at a luncheon at the Matterhorn Conference Center in Elkhart on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2012. (Truth Photo By Evey Wilson) (AP)

State Representative Tim Neese talks to the League of Women Voters of Elkhart County about the upcoming state legislative session at a luncheon at the Matterhorn Conference Center in Elkhart on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2012. (Truth Photo By Evey Wilson) (AP)

State Representative Tim Neese listens to a question from a member of the League of Women Voters of Elkhart County about the upcoming state legislative session at a luncheon at the Matterhorn Conference Center in Elkhart on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2012. (Truth Photo By Evey Wilson) (AP)
Indiana Rep. Neese proposing legislation aimed at robocallers
Posted on Dec. 13, 2012 at 12:00 a.m.

ELKHART — Let the lawmaking being.

Indiana Rep. Tim Neese, who represents northwestern Elkhart County, including a chunk of Elkhart, has already authored two pieces of legislation for consideration in the upcoming legislative session. One aims to crackdown on robocallers, he said Wednesday, while the other is meant to make it a felony for culprits to jostle and push around police when they’re being detained.

Speaking at a gathering of the League of Women Voters of Elkhart County, Neese, a Republican re-elected to his sixth term in November, discussed his proposals and more. The legislative session starts early next year.

Robocallers: Telemarketers that call Hoosiers already on the state’s so-called Do Not Call list would be targeted in Neese’s proposal. State authorities would gain more authority in investigating such telemarketers and the legislation would improve connections with federal officials in dealing with the issue.

Telemarketers are supposed to refrain from calling Hoosiers who register their phone numbers on the Do Not Call list, but Neese said they regularly disregard it. “To some extent, the Do Not Call list has not been as effective as it’s intended,” he said.

Police: As is, if police are injured by violent, uncooperative culprits as they’re being detained, the detainees can face additional charges, according to Neese. Not necessarily so if an officer doesn’t face injury in such circumstances.

Neese’s legislation would change that, potentially subjecting culprits to a Class D felony if they shove or otherwise jostle police, even if the law enforcement officers don’t get hurt. “It gives the court some more authority and input, in my opinion, in protecting police officers,” said Neese.

Vouchers: Neese predicts there could be efforts to expand the state’s new educational voucher program since it’s popular among many.

Neese voted against the measure, which allows parents to tap funding that would otherwise go to public schools to cover the cost of sending their kids to certain private schools. Since schools getting voucher funding would be subject to a measure of state oversight, Neese sees it as government meddling in the private sector, hence his opposition

Creationism: Indiana Sen. Dennis Kruse, a Republican who unsuccessfully proposed a measure in the last session that would have allowed teaching of creationism in public schools, has indicated he may propose a new proposal in the coming session. It’d be a softer approach, allowing students to question what teachers are teaching them, according to the Associated Press.

Neese, for his part, doesn’t favor the idea of teaching creationism in public schools. “I’m of the opinion that creationism is best taught by church representatives and folks at home,” he said.