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Clubs & organizations

Posted on Nov. 18, 2012 at 12:00 a.m.

CONCORD ROTARY CLUB

Linda VanScoik opened the Nov. 8 meeting with the invocation, John Thain with the pledge. Mike Jansen shared Edgar Allen Poe’s poem “The Raven” in homage to the Halloween holiday. Carlos Esteves and Ross Swihart of the Elkhart club were guests.

The club held its annual event of shopping for clothes for Concord School students on Nov. 1, buying for 45 students from 21 families. The event was held at the Meijer store in Dunlap. Thanks to Meijer and its employees for allowing the club to hold this event. Attendance for this event is always excellent. After the shopping, members gathered at Colombo’s restaurant for a pizza celebration. Thanks to all who helped in any way to make this year’s shop a great experience for the club and the students.

Faith Mission has been serving the community since 1956, and Ross Swihart of the Elkhart Noon Rotary Club is the director. Swihart’s father was the director of the mission since 1985 and passed on his legacy to his son. Swihart also oversees the operations of the Thrift Store at 1017 S. Main St. in the old Zimmerman’s building. He is very sincere in his thanks to the Elkhart community and praised the generosity of the people and organizations that support Faith Mission.

Meetings are at noon Wednesdays at Adam’s Catering and Conference Room in Concord Mall. Feel free to stop in for a visit, and be prepared for a great time and interesting meeting.

CREDIT PROFESSIONALS OF GOSHEN

Members met at Dandino’s Nov. 12 with Darla Kauffman, president, presiding.

There will be a Dave Ramsey budgeting class in January. Credit Professionals has scholarships available to those who need assistance with this. Kauffman said, “We believe there are individuals and families who would benefit a great deal with more information on planning ahead or budgeting and they can contact me at 825-2166 for more information.”

Ed Swartley, manager of The Window in Goshen, gave information on the four services of the organization. One of the best known is the meals program, where individuals come into The Window, and the other part is Meals on Wheels, which involves volunteers taking meals to shut-ins or those in need. The compassion given by the volunteers is very much appreciated. The Clothes Closet and the Food Pantry are the other services offered. “This was started by the Church Women United many years ago, and there are many stories to tell of the assistance given to those in need. I do not believe the women 35 years ago would have realized the amount of volunteers, as well as those seeking assistance this has grown into,” Swartley said.

Upcoming: Dec. 10, Christmas party. Members will bring nonperishables for local food pantries.

Visitors are welcome to this club, with the emphasis on wise money management.

DELTA THETA CHI SORORITY, INDIANA ETA CHAPTER

Members met Nov. 13 for a business meeting at Betty Vaughn’s home. Ways and means projects, province and national scholarship deadlines, as well as how to donate coupons to local schools as fundraisers, were discussed. Betty Nelson and Jane Sickman agreed to be chairwomen for the fall 2013 Celaeno Province fall board meeting to be held in Elkhart County. Kent Stouder, Elkhart Fire Department arson specialist, will be the speaker at the Nov. 27 educational meeting.

ELKHART COMMUNITY LIONS CLUB

Twelve members attended the Nov. 6 meeting at the Greenleaf Health Campus.

Sandra Jacobs read a communication from Lion Clubs International; she also gave a committee report on the bazaar. Rosemary Miller, president, reported on the nursing home party and the 25-year anniversary party. Mac Boyer reported on the Salvation Army bell ringing and the fish fry, and Diann Hoyt on the nut sales and dictionary project. It was decided not to have a meeting on Jan 1.

Bessie Wenger told the joke for the evening, and Beverly Deter won the 50/50 drawing and donated it back to the club. Boyer, as tail twister, found reasons to fine several members.

Upcoming: Tuesday, regular meeting with member Terri Longacre as speaker; Nov. 29, bell ringing for the Salvation Army at Concord Mall; Dec. 4, Christmas party at Golden Living instead of the regular meeting; Dec. 18, Lions Christmas party at Longacre’s home instead of the regular meeting.

Meetings are on the first and third Tuesday of the month at the Greenleaf Health Campus. Visitors are welcome.

Information: Rosemary Miller at 269-641-5203

Website: e-Clubhouse.org/sites/ElkhartCommunityIN

ELKHART LIONS CLUB

Members were informed Nov. 7 of Lions Club International Foundation’s aid to victims of Superstorm Sandy and were given information on how to contribute. One hundred percent of funds donated to LCIF go directly to relief efforts.

Nelson Nix, trustee and past president of the Indiana Lions Eye and Tissue Transplant Bank, reminded the club that member Dr. Al Free was instrumental in the formation of the bank and served as its first president. In 1961, 22 corneas were recovered and 19 were transplanted. More than 28,000 people have been aided. Additionally, more than $500,000 has been contributed to the Indiana University Department of Ophthalmology, including funding for a surgery simulator. Other programs sponsored by Indiana Lions are custom cutting of tissue, ocular assistance program and Operation KidSight. More than 77,000 children’s vision has been screened since KidSight began in 2003. Early detection of certain conditions is crucial in preventing blindness.

Upcoming: Dec. 1, Winterfest parade and tree lighting, Dec. 14, Band Night, Jan. 4-5, Mid-Winter Conference in Plainfield; Jan. 19, cabinet meeting in Atwood

Upcoming programs: Nov. 28, John Beck, Edward Jones; Dec. 5, New Paris Lion Dennis Pinkerton, antique toy tractors and farm implements; Dec. 12, John Shoup, Elkhart Civic Theatre

Meetings are at noon Wednesdays at Christiana Creek Country Club and are open to the public. There will not be a meeting this Wednesday.

ELKHART MORNING ROTARY CLUB

Doug Risser of Elkhart Rotary was a guest at the Nov. 8 CAPS breakfast meeting at the RV Hall of Fame.

Upcoming: Thursday, no meeting; Nov. 29, thrift stores

Meetings are at 7 a.m. Thursdays at McCarthy’s on the Riverwalk and are open to guests.

Information: Kristi Bl at 312-0822 or outdoorkristi@gmail.com

ELKHART ROTARY CLUB

A broken water main caused the Nov. 12 meeting to be moved from the Matterhorn to Lerner’s Crystal Ballroom.

Elkhart Rotary, in partnership with the Matterhorn Banquet and Conference Center, will once again serve more than 2,000 meals on Thanksgiving Day to needy families in the community. If you would like to “sponsor” a turkey, simply drop one off or send a check for $25 made out to Matterhorn Banquet and Conference Center.

Doug Thorne, sergeant-at-arms, recognized all members who served in the armed forces. He then fined all the bankers for taking the day off. Thorne noticed that each week when the Notre Dame fans are asked to stand, the number of those standing is growing. He also fined James Brotherson for working for the world’s no. 1 law firm. The sergeant’s committee raises more than $18,000 a year in “fines,” which are donated to local charities.

Dr. Robert Tomec, South Bend Medical Foundation, spoke. Founded in 1912, the SBMF is celebrating 100 years in business. Eight hundred employees serve 50-plus hospitals. They perform 5 million medical tests per year and draw blood from 5,000 patients per day. Also, $1,000 million a year in revenue allows the SBMF to operate a blood bank and prepare for biological incidents. For more information visit: www.sbmflab.org.

“Like” the club on Facebook; search for Elkhart Rotary Club.

Upcoming: Monday, Dr. Robert Haworth, new Elkhart Community Schools superintendent; Nov. 26, Liz Naquin Borger, the $150 million Gundlach gift to Elkhart County.

Meetings are at noon Mondays at the Matterhorn Banquet and Conference Center.

Information: Visit www.elkhartrotary.org, or call Tom Shoff at 293-5530 or email tom@shoff.com

GOSHEN NOON KIWANIS CLUB

Tom Snobarger and Joel Richard were greeters at the Nov. 6 meeting. Phil Wogoman introduced guests Keith Fox, Chaney Bergdall and Susan Stiffney.

The club voted unanimously to confirm Jim Smith’s candidacy for governor-elect of Indiana’s 13/14 District of Kiwanis International.

Dave McGuire presented perfect attendance awards to Gene Lange for 34 years and Tim Yoder for 36 years.

Glen Kauffmann introduced Mark Torma, Volunteer Lawyer Network executive director. It is an organization dedicated to promoting and facilitating pro bono legal services throughout north-central Indiana. Torma is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame, and had a career in public advocacy in Washington, D.C., before attending law school at the University of Minnesota. Torma explained that the Volunteer Lawyer Network matches attorneys with clients in need. It does not place cases in which the lawyer will receive a percentage of the award. It is a state-funded program that places 80 cases per year. The services reduce the burden of social services while increasing the efficiency, effectiveness and productivity of the legal system.

Meetings are at noon Tuesdays at Maplecrest Country Club and are open to the public.

Information: Ben Williams at 596-4062

GOSHEN ROTARY CLUB

Two new members were welcomed into club at the Nov. 9 meeting, Susan Bartush, who works at Everence, and Phil Waite, new pastor at College Mennonite Church on the Goshen College campus. Visiting Rotarians and guests included Rotarian Don Stohler and Angie Miller.

Rich Meyer, Elkhart County Clubhouse director, spoke. The Clubhouse is part of state and national efforts and exists to give support to people with a history of mental illness.

The emphasis, Meyer said, is to help people with a history of mental illness return to meaningful work. There are currently two Clubhouse members in transitional employment, with the goal of returning to the work force full time, and more will soon be transitionally employed.

The Elkhart County Clubhouse is six months old, and though closely associated with Oaklawn, is independent. A national accrediting body, the International Center for Clubhouse Development, will be in Goshen soon for an on-site visit.

The Clubhouse is at 114 S. Fifth St. and is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. In addition to Meyer, there are three other staff members. Besides the weekday hours, Clubhouse members and staff get together every other Saturday for social events.

The Clubhouse has about 50 members ranging in age from teenagers to people in their 60s, and a dozen to 15 visit daily. The staff and members meet daily at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. to plan daily work in an attempt to establish an orderly pattern in members’ lives.

The Clubhouse is not faith-based, but works with all faiths and religions. Meyer added, though, that the staff members are there because of their personal faith. He ended by saying the Clubhouse does not provide counseling to members, adding, “There is a place in the recovery process where you need a place like this.”

Upcoming: Tuesday, November social gathering at Ignition Garage

JEFFERSON EXTENSION HOMEMAKERS CLUB

Twelve members met Nov. 7 at Penny Stroup’s home. She served members a delicious brunch. Coins for Friendship and Nickels for Leadership were collected, Janet Yoder read an inspirational story and Margaret Pettifer gave the health and safety lesson about prescription medication safety. Joann Fisher gave the lesson “Smart Consumers Read and Use Labels.”

Members completed a craft project of making Christmas bookmarks and cards.

Upcoming: Some members will be going to Meijer Gardens in Grand Rapids, Mich., on Dec. 5, so the club Christmas party at Bent Oak restaurant was moved to Dec. 12.

MAPLE CITY KIWANIS CLUB

Bob Duell greeted 23 members and one guest were at the Nov. 8 meeting.

Janet Buccicone introduced Ted Bryant of Green Lockers, which is a nonprofit organization that collects slightly used school supplies and distributes them free to schools and other charity organizations. Items are collected at the end of the school year when kids clean out their lockers, and, instead of being thrown away, they are recycled and used by others. Kids themselves in each school are in charge of the project. Besides providing needed items for children in need, reduction of waste is a goal of Green Lockers. Last year it distributed 24,000 pounds of used school supplies, clothes and books.

Upcoming: Friday, Christmas tree sales begin at Kercher’s Orchard

Meetings are at 6:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Goshen Salvation Army. Guests are welcome.

Information: Phil Berkey at 238-7484.

MAPLE CITY TOASTMASTERS CLUB

The club met Nov. 6 and was entertained, informed and trained as members sharpened each other while having fun. Judy Moore opened the meeting and presided as toastmaster. Jo Ellen Eisenhour gave a “Word of the Day” to use in speaking and challenged all to use good grammar. Aaron Kindig gave the first speech of the day, talking about the “upper lower peninsula,” and Tim Loutzenhiser, secretary, informed members, with a second speech, about being an effective salesperson. Sondra Resen vice president of education, led the Table Topics so everyone would have a chance to speak. Glen Stutzman led the evaluation half of the meeting with assistance from speech evaluator Dale Hoover and Brian Pinnegar, timekeeper.

Meetings are from 12:10 to 1 p.m. Tuesdays at the Goshen Chamber of Commerce, where they meet to practice their listening, thinking and speaking skills. Meetings are open to the public.

Information: 830-5556, or go online with John Bipus, vice president of membership, at jbipus@bipususa.com

Email: jkaylentz@aol.com Fax: 294-3895 Mail: The Elkhart Truth, Attention: Clubs and Organizations, P.O. Box 487, Elkhart, IN 46515 Drop-off: Elkhart newsroom, 421 S. Second St. Deadline: Noon Tuesdays With each submission please include: Brief recap of most recent meeting and details of scheduled events for members and the public Time, day, date and place for next meetings and whether meetings are open to the public


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