Thursday, December 18, 2014


Theresa Lewis holds a Purple Heart and Bronze Star earned by her father Leon Anglemyer during World War II. Lewis is trying to have her father's name added to the memorial wall in the basement of the Elkhart City Hall. Anglemyer served in the European theatre and was a prisoner of war held in Germany. (Jennifer Shephard / The Elkhart Truth)

One of three sections of a memorial in the basement of Elkhart City Hall as seen June 17, 2014. Elkhart resident Theresa Lewis is trying to get the name of her father, Leon Anglemyer, placed in the memorial. Anglemyer served in the European Theatre and was a Prisoner of War. (Jennifer Shephard) (Buy this photo)
Elkhart mayor Dick Moore agrees WWII vet's name deserves to be on city hall memorial
Posted on June 24, 2014 at 1:21 p.m.

ELKHART — Elkhart Mayor Dick Moore looked into the records and confirmed the details of Leon Anglemyer’s service in World War II.

Accordingly, the late Elkhart County man’s name will go up on a memorial at Elkhart City Hall that names local people who served in the war.

“We’ll get it done,” Moore said Tuesday, June 24.

Anglemyer’s daughter, Theresa Lewis, has been trying on and off for the past several years to get the man’s name on the large wooden memorial, located along a wall in the lower level of city hall. The U.S. Army veteran, who died in 1964, served in Europe during World War II and was held by German troops in a prisoner of war camp before his liberation and return to the United States.

An Elkhart Truth article posted online on June 20 detailed Lewis’ efforts and, in response, Moore did some checking. "The main thing, he served in the military in World War II, maybe a little bit more,“ said the mayor. ”I can’t imagine what being a prisoner of war would be like.“

Lewis expressed delight. “It means a lot to my family,” she said Tuesday.

Ron Lundy, the Elkhart County veterans service officer, offered praise. He checked Anglemyer’s records for Moore, confirming details of his military service. "Absolutely, he’s a hero,” said Lundy.

The wooden piece inscribed with Anglemyer’s name for the memorial has to be made. Then some sort of ceremony will likely follow, according to Moore.

Lewis, meanwhile, has put a couple more requests to the mayor. The names of two of her dad’s brothers, also from Elkhart County and also veterans of World War II, are missing from the city hall memorial, she said. She’d like to see their names, Everett and Wilbur Anglemyer, on the memorial as well.

Follow reporter Tim Vandenack on Twitter at @timvandenack or visit him on Facebook.