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Street Talk: Thoughts on terrorism and the Sochi Winter Olympics

Correspondent Mark Shephard visited Goshen this week and asked, "How do you feel about the Sochi Winter Olympics about to get underway in the shadow of a war zone with a threat of Islamic terrorism?"


Posted on Feb. 7, 2014 at 12:07 a.m.

Correspondent Mark Shephard visited Goshen this week and asked, "How do you feel about the Sochi Winter Olympics about to get underway in the shadow of a war zone with a threat of Islamic terrorism?"

John Blosser, retired art professor, Goshen:

"I can understand why it’s worrisome for those who could be targeted, including the U.S., but anybody who comes in could be targeted. On the other hand, I can understand why they’re proceeding and doing the best they can with the security. Hopefully, it will all work out OK."

Matt McGlothlen, commercial sales representative, Granger:

"I’m kind of indifferent, to be honest. As long as our government is there to protect our Olympians and their families, I’m OK with it." Follow-up question: Do you have confidence that Russia will provide the appropriate security? "I don’t have confidence in Russia, but I have confidence in our government."

Brenda Larue, small business owner, Millersburg:

"I’m hoping that there is safety for all, and that it goes off with out anything major happening." Follow-up question: How do you feel about the International Olympic Committee approving this site knowing that Russia has been at war with Chechnya twice in the past 20 years? "I don’t know about that, but this is Russia’s opportunity to shine. So be it."

Jason Wilt, cashier, Goshen:

"About the same I do for every Olympics. I wish everybody the best of luck. Go, USA! You always want to be on guard, but I don’t think it’s going to be a threat so much because it’s all going to be broadcast. Everybody knows that as soon as you do it that you’re done. You’re busted right then and there." Follow-up statement: But that’s what the terrorists are looking for. They want to put Putin in a bad light, because he has brought war to their homeland and their peoples. "Well, I see that, but at the same time, it’s not really going to make him look bad, as much as it’s going to make them look bad, and I don’t think they’ll be accomplishing anything."

David Giddens, city worker, Goshen:

"I think despite that everything that goes on in the world, the Olympics is bigger than that, and I think it will be fine." Follow-up question: Are you confident that Russia can protect the athletes and the people who attend? "I’m confident that Russia and all the other security forces that will be in place (will keep) the athletes and participants safe."

Chrissy Fry, social worker, Middlebury:

"I’ve talked about that with people, and if I had a family member that was actually participating, I’m not sure if I would go or not. It would have to be a prayerful decision, for sure." Follow-up question: How do you feel about the Olympic Committee deciding to hold the Olympics here when they knew the history of the place? "I’m not sure it was the best decision, but I feel like there’s probably so much more information that I don’t know. I don’t really know how it all works to be able to make an informed decision."




 Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, left, and Veterans Affairs Undersecretary of Health Robert Petzel, MD, prepare to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 15, 2014, before the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee hearing to examine the state of Veterans Affairs health care. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Posted on May 16, 2014 at 3:52 p.m.
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